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(2.23) How much detail should be included in my child’s written assessment?

(2.23) How much detail should be included in my child’s written assessment?

The written assessment should give you a clear picture of your child’s functioning in all the areas tested. California Education Code Section 56327 requires that the report shall include, but it is not limited to, all of the following:

  1. Whether the student may need special education and related services;
  2. The basis for making the determination;
  3. The relevant behavior noted during the observation of the student in an appropriate setting;
  4. The relationship of that behavior to the student’s academic and social functioning;
  5. The educationally relevant health and development and medical findings, if any;
  6. For students with learning disabilities, whether there is such a discrepancy between achievement and ability that cannot be corrected without special education and related services;
  7. A determination concerning the effects of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage, where appropriate; and
  8. The need for specialized services, materials, and equipment for students with low incidence disabilities.

In addition, specific details should be included on areas of deficit (weakness or delay) and areas of strength that can be used to assist the child in remedying those deficits.  As a parent, you should be able to understand how your child’s learning style and learning deficits and strengths affect his ability to learn. If this is not clear to you, ask school personnel to explain it to you. Feel free to ask them to explain technical terms in easily-understood language. Assessments must determine not only eligibility, but also the proposed content of your child’s IEP and information related to enabling him to be involved and progress in the general curriculum, or for preschoolers, appropriate activities.  [20 U.S.C. Sec. 1414(b)(2); 34 C.F.R. Sec. 300.304(b)(1)(ii).]